Christmas Bazaar

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Christmas Bazaar
Nov 192017
 

DON’T forget that it is nearly time for the Christmas Bazaar on Friday 1st December.  There will be lots of fun events and games plus opportunities to buy lovely Christmas presents for mums, dads and grandparents.

There will also be some amazing festive foods or the famous Alfriston Hampers to try and win.

from Mrs Jones

Odd Socks Day

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Odd Socks Day
Nov 132017
 

Odd Socks Day on Friendship Friday

Odd Socks day will take place at Alfriston on Friday 17th November or, as we like to call it, Friendship Friday.  There is no pressure on the children to wear the latest fashion or for parents to buy expensive costumes. All they have to do to take part is wear odd socks to school, it couldn’t be simpler! 

You do not have to raise money to take part – the most important thing is the message of Odd Socks Day – it’s an opportunity for children to express themselves and appreciate individuality and uniqueness! Please encourage your daughter to wear odd socks (for one day only!) to show her support for friends and her commitment to Anti Bullying Week.

We’re all different, all equal.

Check out this video on YouTube

Oct 192017
 

Be Safe This Hallowe’en!

Hallowe’en can be a lot of fun but it can also be frightening for some people and there are some risks as well.

I suggest you don’t:

  • Go alone – ‘trick or treating’ is more fun and safer if you go in a small group with friends and family.
  • Go into houses – stay on the doorstep where the responsible adult can see you.
  • Play pranks that may damage property – this could result in arrest and a criminal record.
  • Demand money or intimidate people – Halloween can be a night that some residents dread, so be respectful and polite.
  • Throw eggs or flour – it’s classed as a criminal offence and you will be arrested!

 

You can print out posters to show whether you want to participate in Trick or Treating or not.

There are several websites you can visit for more advice, posters to print and fun ideas such as:

safe4autumn.com

Thames Valley Police

BBC

And make sure you are safe on the roads by dressing to be seen – wear light, reflective clothes or carry a lamp or torch so that drivers and your responsible adult can see you.  You can buy reflective badges and clips from the kiosk at school (prices range from 60p to £1.40)

By Katie on behalf of School Council

Tuesday 10th October is World Mental Health Day

 Uncategorized, Whole School  Comments Off on Tuesday 10th October is World Mental Health Day
Oct 092017
 

Alfriston School is raising vital funds for Buckinghamshire Mind on World Mental Health Day, 10th October, by donating the takings from the kiosk that week.

To help pupils understand the issues and to support their wellbeing, Buckinghamshire Mind will be delivering a uniquely designed mental health awareness assembly.

Mental health problems affect about 1 in 10 children and young people, which is as many as three children in every class. However, 70% of children and young people who experience a mental health problem have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age.

Buckinghamshire Mind aims to address this by raising awareness of mental health within schools, promoting mental health wellbeing for children and tackling stigma by helping children to understand what a mental health problem is and to talk about mental health.

Buckinghamshire Mind provides a range of services for schools to support mental health wellbeing.
Look at these positive comments made by children and young people in schools who have benefited from the Peer Mentoring in Schools Service:
“This service gives you confidence to be who you are in a safe and accepting environment.”
“It gives people a place to talk and be comfortable being themselves. It’s also very fun and helpful.”
“I’ve loved having a safe environment to talk in and be free, to have a place of security is invaluable.”

Mental health problems can affect anyone, any day of the year. However, World Mental Health Day on 10th October, is a great day for schools, communities and individuals to show support for better mental health and for everyone to start looking after their own wellbeing.

To find out more about Buckinghamshire Mind and the mental health services it provides, please visit www.bucksmind.org.uk

 

Supporting Victims of the Mexican Earthquake

 Community Links, Uncategorized, Whole School  Comments Off on Supporting Victims of the Mexican Earthquake
Oct 052017
 

When we heard about the earthquake in Mexico, we decided that we wanted to do something to help.  We had already planned our Non-Uniform days and other charity events but felt that it was important to squeeze this in as an extra.  So what could we do that was different to our existing plans?

 

In the end we thought it would be really easy to ask people to bring in their loose change to see if we could complete a money mosaic on the playground.  We decided to send our money via Save the Children so thought an out line of a child would be good.  In the end we arranged several child figures in a circle and went about laying out the coins; everything from pennies to two pounds had been handed in.

Everybody joined in and it got very busy on the playground and soon the outlines were completed and we set about filling in the shapes.  They looked great!

 

When all the coins were laid down, the Maths department very kindly offered to sweep up all the money and count it and we made an impressive total which currently exceeds £180 and still more change promised.

 

Thank you to everyone who donated and took part and let’s hope we make some difference for the people affected by the earthquake.

Be Safe in the Sun the Summer

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Be Safe in the Sun the Summer
Jun 152017
 

family-suncare-kids1

 

 

Sun safety tips

Spend time in the shade when the sun is strongest. In the UK, this is between 11am and 3pm from March to October.

Make sure you:

  • spend time in the shade between 11am and 3pm
  • make sure you never burn
  • cover up with suitable clothing and sunglasses
  • take extra care with children
  • use at least factor 15 sunscreen

Don’t rely on sunscreen alone to protect yourself from the sun. Wear suitable clothing and spend time in the shade when the sun’s at its hottest.

When buying sunscreen, the label should have:

  • a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 to protect against UVB
  • at least four-star UVA protection

UVA protection can also be indicated by the letters “UVA” in a circle, which indicates that it meets the EU standard.

Make sure the sunscreen is not past its expiry date. Most sunscreens have a shelf life of two to three years.

Don’t spend any longer in the sun than you would without sunscreen.

 

How to apply sunscreen

Most people don’t apply enough sunscreen. As a guide, adults should aim to apply around:

  • two teaspoons of sunscreen if you’re just covering your head, arms and neck
  • two tablespoons if you’re covering your entire body while wearing a swimming costume

If sunscreen is applied too thinly, the amount of protection it gives is reduced. If you’re worried you might not be applying enough SPF15, you could use a stronger SPF30 sunscreen.

If you plan to be out in the sun long enough to risk burning, sunscreen needs to be applied twice:

  • 30 minutes before going out
  • just before going out

Sunscreen should be applied to all exposed skin, including the face, neck and ears – and head if you have thinning or no hair – but a wide-brimmed hat is better.

Sunscreen needs to be reapplied liberally and frequently, and according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

This includes applying it straight after you’ve been in water – even if it’s “water resistant” – and after towel drying, sweating, or when it may have rubbed off.

 

For further guidance, advice and instruction please check the website

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/skin/Pages/Sunsafe.aspx

 

Parenting in a Digital World

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Parenting in a Digital World
May 052017
 

Unsure how to support your teenager to be safer and enjoy their digital world?

We’ll be running a session to help you!

Thursday 25th May, 6pm at Alfriston School

Come along and find out about the digital life skills you can teach them that will help them stay safer and get the most out of everything technology has to offer.

The session will be led by Sophie Linington, Deputy CEO of Parent Zone, experts in tech and families.  There will be opportunities to ask questions and understand how you can best prepare your children for their digital future.

As this is such an important topic, we are extending this invitation to other schools.  Additionally, please feel free to invite other family and friends who might be interested and who could benefit from this information and training

Please contact Charlene Cheung, Head of Wellbeing on 01494 673 740

Charlene.cheung@alfristonschool.com to confirm your place and the place of any additional attendees

 

 

 

May 032017
 

How to bid: In order to place a bid you must contact Rachel Hutchinson via postal or email bid. Details can be found below on the bidding slip. There are two separate items for auction.
Item 1 details: Signed England Cricket Shirt from the England v Sri Lanka Test Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.

item 1 a item 1 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2 details: Signed England Cricket Bat from the England v Pakistan Royal London ODI Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.item 2 aitem 2 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both items have been acquired and kindly donated by Waitrose for the South Bucks School Sport Partnership. The money raised will go directly into the partnership and will be used to buy new equipment, the cost of venue hire for events and certificates and medals for competitions.

Payment: After the closing date the highest bidder for each auction will be contacted and asked to make payment to the Alfriston School bank account via BACS, cash or cheque within one week. Once payment is received the item can be collected or hand delivered if within 25 miles of Alfriston School or alternatively via signed for parcel at Royal Mail.
Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2017 12pm midday

Contact Rachel for further details:rachel@alfristonschool.com

Mar 272017
 

This week is World Autism Awareness Week.  Here at Alfriston we started early and, on the occasion of the Singing Showcase we had a stall to display information about Autism when parents visited.  We also had a donations bucket on the stall and raised £116.55 for the cause.  Thank you.

This week, teachers at Alfriston will be asked to take part in a quiz about autism and pupils will be able to find out more about the condition by chatting with pupils who have been identified on the spectrum.  There will also be a chance to view excerpts from the feature film about Temple Grandin.

In the meantime, read on for some information about Autism from the National Autistic Society.

 

How does autism affect children, adults and their families?

The term ‘autism’ is used here to describe all diagnostic profiles, including Asperger syndrome and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA).

  1. Without understanding, autistic people and families are at risk of being isolated and developing mental health problems.
  2. Autism is much more common than many people think. There are around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the UK – that’s more than 1 in 1001. If you include their families, autism is a part of daily life for 2.8 million people.
  3. Autism doesn’t just affect children. Autistic children grow up to be autistic adults.
  4. Autism is a hidden disability – you can’t always tell if someone is autistic.
  5. While autism is incurable, the right support at the right time can make an enormous difference to people’s lives.
  6. 34% of children on the autism spectrum say that the worst thing about being at school is being picked on2.
  7. 63% of children on the autism spectrum are not in the kind of school their parents believe would best support them3.
  8. 17% of autistic children have been suspended from school; 48% of these had been suspended three or more times; 4% had been expelled from one or more schools4.
  9. Seventy per cent of autistic adults say that they are not getting the help they need from social services. Seventy per cent of autistic adults also told us that with more support they would feel less isolated5.
  10. At least one in three autistic adults are experiencing severe mental health difficulties due to a lack of support6.
  11. Only 16% of autistic adults in the UK are in full-time paid employment, and only 32% are in some kind of paid work7.
  12. Only 10% of autistic adults receive employment support but 53% say they want it8.

 

References

1 The NHS Information Centre, Community and Mental Health Team, Brugha, T. et al (2012). Estimating the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions in adults: extending the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Leeds: NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

2 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p7

3  Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p18

4 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p8

5 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

6 Rosenblatt, M (2008). I Exist: the message from adults with autism in England. London: The National Autistic Society, p3

7 The National Autistic Society (2016). The autism employment gap: Too Much Information in the workplace. p5

8 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

 

Myths and facts about autism

Although over 700,000 people in the UK are autistic (more than 1 in 100 people), false and often negative perceptions about the condition are commonplace.

 

This lack of understanding can make it difficult for people on the autism spectrum to have their condition recognised and to access the support they need. Misconceptions can lead to some autistic people feeling isolated and alone. In extreme cases, it can also lead to abuse and bullying.

 

  • Autism affects more than 1 in 100 people – Over 700,000 people in UK are autistic, which means that 2.8m people have a relative on the autism spectrum.
  • People tend to ‘grow out’ of autism in adulthood – myth. It’s a lifelong condition – autistic children become autistic adults.
  • Autism affects both boys and girls – fact. There is a popular misconception that autism is simply a male condition. This is false.
  • Some autistic people don’t speak – fact. Some autistic people are non-verbal and communicate through other means. However, autism is a spectrum condition, so everyone’s autism is different.
  • Autism is a mental health problem – myth. Autism is a developmental disability. It’s a difference in how your brain works. Autistic people can have good mental health, or experience mental health problems, just like anyone else.
  • All autistic people are geniuses – myth. Just under half of all people diagnosed with autism also have a learning disability. Others have an IQ in the average to above average range. ‘Savant’ abilities like extraordinary memory are rare.
  • Everyone is a bit autistic – myth. While everyone might recognise some autistic traits or behaviours in people they know, to be diagnosed with autism, a person must consistently display behaviours across all the different areas of the condition. Just having a fondness for routines, a good memory or being shy doesn’t make a person ‘a bit autistic’.

 

 

Meltdown

Many autistic people experience meltdowns. The public often find it hard to tell autism meltdowns and temper tantrums apart, but they are different things. You can help by understanding autism, the person and what to do if you see someone having a meltdown.

A meltdown is ‘an intense response to overwhelming situations’. It happens when someone becomes completely overwhelmed by their current situation and temporarily loses behavioural control. This loss of control can be expressed verbally (eg shouting, screaming, crying), physically (eg kicking, lashing out, biting) or in both ways.

What to do

If someone is having a meltdown, or not responding to you, don’t judge them. It can make a world of

difference to someone on the autism spectrum and their carers.

  • Give them some time − it can take a while to recover from an information or sensory overload.
  • Calmly ask them (or their parent or friend) if they’re OK, but bear in mind they’ll need more time to respond than you might expect.
  • Make space − try to create a quiet, safe space as best you can. Ask people to move along and not

to stare, turn off loud music and turn down bright lights – whatever you can think of to reduce the

information overload, try it.

 

Watch

My Autism and Me

What Do Y8 Think About The Internet?

 English, esafety, Uncategorized  Comments Off on What Do Y8 Think About The Internet?
Feb 212017
 

How can you be safer on the Internet?

Year 8s talk about how to be safer on the Internet.

 

Many of you will use the Internet every day, because some of you can look up some good things. The internet is a fantastic tool to chat with your friend. Some people can find different pictures like boys and drawings. Some of you lot can chat to your friends and face time them on the Internet.

 

Whilst the Internet is a good tool, you need to be careful about other people who are using it. Weird people can say rude things about your body. They can try to find your number and your address. Mrs Shorrocks said that “We should report the person if they being rude and you can block them.”

 

Some of the teachers are worried about us using the internet, they want to make sure we are being careful. We can find pictures and we can play games. It has been found out that 70% of people are being rude. Emma said that “We can talk to our friends but we can’t talk to weird people.”

 

Here are a few top tips to be safe:

. You can block them

. You can report them

. Don’t put pictures up of your body

 

So  remember to be safe. Don’t forget to show what you are doing to parents or teachers.

 

Louise