Nov 202017
 

All vehicles are heavy and hard and can hit and hurt people. At higher speeds they cause more damage. At higher speeds, a driver has less time to react if a child steps out in front of them. They are more likely to hit that child and will hit them harder. Fast traffic is dangerous, frightening, noisy and polluting. It makes roads unwelcome and puts people off walking and cycling.

You can read all the facts about road speed in this handy fact sheet or watch this video to gain a better understanding of why speed matters.

Meanwhile don’t forget the importance of being bright and being seen in these long dark nights of winter. We are selling reflective items in the kiosk.

Star Clips £1.40
Zip clips 60p
Smile Badges £1.00
Reflective Laces £1.00
Reflective stickers 15p

Oct 192017
 

Be Safe This Hallowe’en!

Hallowe’en can be a lot of fun but it can also be frightening for some people and there are some risks as well.

I suggest you don’t:

  • Go alone – ‘trick or treating’ is more fun and safer if you go in a small group with friends and family.
  • Go into houses – stay on the doorstep where the responsible adult can see you.
  • Play pranks that may damage property – this could result in arrest and a criminal record.
  • Demand money or intimidate people – Halloween can be a night that some residents dread, so be respectful and polite.
  • Throw eggs or flour – it’s classed as a criminal offence and you will be arrested!

 

You can print out posters to show whether you want to participate in Trick or Treating or not.

There are several websites you can visit for more advice, posters to print and fun ideas such as:

safe4autumn.com

Thames Valley Police

BBC

And make sure you are safe on the roads by dressing to be seen – wear light, reflective clothes or carry a lamp or torch so that drivers and your responsible adult can see you.  You can buy reflective badges and clips from the kiosk at school (prices range from 60p to £1.40)

By Katie on behalf of School Council

Jul 052017
 

You have probably seen the press coverage about Snapchat’s new feature and the potential risks for young users but what will you do about it?

 

As ever it is important that you understand the features of Snapchat yourselves and that you discuss the risks with your daughters.  The most important thing is to make sure that the settings your daughter is using will keep her safe.  It is easy to change the settings and this advice from NSPCC is very clear.

Additionally the NSPCC’s Share Aware campaign is a very useful resource for parents who want to know more about the most popular apps currently available.

 

 

https://www.net-aware.org.uk/news/snap-map/

May 032017
 

How to bid: In order to place a bid you must contact Rachel Hutchinson via postal or email bid. Details can be found below on the bidding slip. There are two separate items for auction.
Item 1 details: Signed England Cricket Shirt from the England v Sri Lanka Test Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.

item 1 a item 1 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2 details: Signed England Cricket Bat from the England v Pakistan Royal London ODI Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.item 2 aitem 2 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both items have been acquired and kindly donated by Waitrose for the South Bucks School Sport Partnership. The money raised will go directly into the partnership and will be used to buy new equipment, the cost of venue hire for events and certificates and medals for competitions.

Payment: After the closing date the highest bidder for each auction will be contacted and asked to make payment to the Alfriston School bank account via BACS, cash or cheque within one week. Once payment is received the item can be collected or hand delivered if within 25 miles of Alfriston School or alternatively via signed for parcel at Royal Mail.
Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2017 12pm midday

Contact Rachel for further details:rachel@alfristonschool.com

Mar 272017
 

This week is World Autism Awareness Week.  Here at Alfriston we started early and, on the occasion of the Singing Showcase we had a stall to display information about Autism when parents visited.  We also had a donations bucket on the stall and raised £116.55 for the cause.  Thank you.

This week, teachers at Alfriston will be asked to take part in a quiz about autism and pupils will be able to find out more about the condition by chatting with pupils who have been identified on the spectrum.  There will also be a chance to view excerpts from the feature film about Temple Grandin.

In the meantime, read on for some information about Autism from the National Autistic Society.

 

How does autism affect children, adults and their families?

The term ‘autism’ is used here to describe all diagnostic profiles, including Asperger syndrome and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA).

  1. Without understanding, autistic people and families are at risk of being isolated and developing mental health problems.
  2. Autism is much more common than many people think. There are around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the UK – that’s more than 1 in 1001. If you include their families, autism is a part of daily life for 2.8 million people.
  3. Autism doesn’t just affect children. Autistic children grow up to be autistic adults.
  4. Autism is a hidden disability – you can’t always tell if someone is autistic.
  5. While autism is incurable, the right support at the right time can make an enormous difference to people’s lives.
  6. 34% of children on the autism spectrum say that the worst thing about being at school is being picked on2.
  7. 63% of children on the autism spectrum are not in the kind of school their parents believe would best support them3.
  8. 17% of autistic children have been suspended from school; 48% of these had been suspended three or more times; 4% had been expelled from one or more schools4.
  9. Seventy per cent of autistic adults say that they are not getting the help they need from social services. Seventy per cent of autistic adults also told us that with more support they would feel less isolated5.
  10. At least one in three autistic adults are experiencing severe mental health difficulties due to a lack of support6.
  11. Only 16% of autistic adults in the UK are in full-time paid employment, and only 32% are in some kind of paid work7.
  12. Only 10% of autistic adults receive employment support but 53% say they want it8.

 

References

1 The NHS Information Centre, Community and Mental Health Team, Brugha, T. et al (2012). Estimating the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions in adults: extending the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Leeds: NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

2 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p7

3  Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p18

4 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p8

5 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

6 Rosenblatt, M (2008). I Exist: the message from adults with autism in England. London: The National Autistic Society, p3

7 The National Autistic Society (2016). The autism employment gap: Too Much Information in the workplace. p5

8 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

 

Myths and facts about autism

Although over 700,000 people in the UK are autistic (more than 1 in 100 people), false and often negative perceptions about the condition are commonplace.

 

This lack of understanding can make it difficult for people on the autism spectrum to have their condition recognised and to access the support they need. Misconceptions can lead to some autistic people feeling isolated and alone. In extreme cases, it can also lead to abuse and bullying.

 

  • Autism affects more than 1 in 100 people – Over 700,000 people in UK are autistic, which means that 2.8m people have a relative on the autism spectrum.
  • People tend to ‘grow out’ of autism in adulthood – myth. It’s a lifelong condition – autistic children become autistic adults.
  • Autism affects both boys and girls – fact. There is a popular misconception that autism is simply a male condition. This is false.
  • Some autistic people don’t speak – fact. Some autistic people are non-verbal and communicate through other means. However, autism is a spectrum condition, so everyone’s autism is different.
  • Autism is a mental health problem – myth. Autism is a developmental disability. It’s a difference in how your brain works. Autistic people can have good mental health, or experience mental health problems, just like anyone else.
  • All autistic people are geniuses – myth. Just under half of all people diagnosed with autism also have a learning disability. Others have an IQ in the average to above average range. ‘Savant’ abilities like extraordinary memory are rare.
  • Everyone is a bit autistic – myth. While everyone might recognise some autistic traits or behaviours in people they know, to be diagnosed with autism, a person must consistently display behaviours across all the different areas of the condition. Just having a fondness for routines, a good memory or being shy doesn’t make a person ‘a bit autistic’.

 

 

Meltdown

Many autistic people experience meltdowns. The public often find it hard to tell autism meltdowns and temper tantrums apart, but they are different things. You can help by understanding autism, the person and what to do if you see someone having a meltdown.

A meltdown is ‘an intense response to overwhelming situations’. It happens when someone becomes completely overwhelmed by their current situation and temporarily loses behavioural control. This loss of control can be expressed verbally (eg shouting, screaming, crying), physically (eg kicking, lashing out, biting) or in both ways.

What to do

If someone is having a meltdown, or not responding to you, don’t judge them. It can make a world of

difference to someone on the autism spectrum and their carers.

  • Give them some time − it can take a while to recover from an information or sensory overload.
  • Calmly ask them (or their parent or friend) if they’re OK, but bear in mind they’ll need more time to respond than you might expect.
  • Make space − try to create a quiet, safe space as best you can. Ask people to move along and not

to stare, turn off loud music and turn down bright lights – whatever you can think of to reduce the

information overload, try it.

 

Watch

My Autism and Me

Jan 162017
 

The School Council members have been talking about our use of technological devices and how it impacts on our lives.  We are thinking of writing some guidelines for parents about the sort of rules they should impose at home.  The girls are collecting opinions via pastoral groups and some girls are completing more detailed questionnaires.

 

It seems to be a very hot topic at the moment and there were articles in the national press just this weekend.  There has been concern about how screen time affects mental health and general wellbeing.  Here at Alfriston, we have been particularly concerned about effects on sleep patterns.

 

However, this latest research, from Oxford University, suggests that screen time can have beneficial effects on young users.  They claim that digital connectivity may enhance creativity, communication skills and development.  They suggest that there is an optimal amount of screen time or a “Goldilocks” zone as they put it, about two hours on a smartphone each day, for example.

 

It will be interesting to see what our pupils think on the matter.  If you have any strong opinions or just want to comment on your experiences with your own children, I would be pleased to hear from you.

 

We hope to publish our guidelines in time for Safer Internet Day on February 7th.

 

 

Please address any comments to Ros Shorrocks on

office@alfristonschool.com

Do you want your Christmas to start early?

 Community Links, parental involvement, Whole School  Comments Off on Do you want your Christmas to start early?
Nov 242016
 

On Friday 2nd December our school will be holding a Christmas Bazaar in the hall. There will be fun games and food to eat. We will be raising money for our school and local charities. You will be able to buy crafts, cards and calendars. We will also have a tombola, hamper raffle and a cafe. The students get to go in first and need to bring a plastic bag. Parents can come along at 10.15 to 12.45. Come along and join the fun!

 

by Ionie

Nov 012016
 

When the fabulous boyband Boycode agreed to visit Alfriston, we were delighted not just because of their entertainment value but also because of the important message they brought about online safety and cyberbullying.

They didn’t claim to be experts but since they were at school just a few years ago, they felt they knew first hand exactly what pressures the girls might be under and they urged the girls to make the right decisions in life with respect to online safety, bullying and discrimination.
Their top tips for online safety were:
• Never give out personal information, such as telephone numbers, home address or details about your school, college or place of work – sometimes you don’t know who will end up with this information and what they could do with it.
• Never agree to meet someone you are in contact with over the internet. Remember, not everyone is who they say they are. If you don’t know who they are, how do you know they are a real person? People can easily set up fake profiles, with a picture that isn’t of them (use a story) – Catfish the TV show on MTV – Shows how many people actually pretend to be other people on the Internet, you don’t know that you are actually speaking to that person
• If someone says something that makes you feel upset, uncomfortable or threatened, save the messages but do not respond. Then tell a parent/carer/or report it online – If you respond you can make things worse and escalate the situation. Make the right decision and be the bigger person
• Never send pictures of yourself or any of your friends or family to anyone you meet online that you wouldn’t want other people to see. Once you send it, it could be sent/shown to other people, so if you wouldn’t want other people to see it – don’t send it!
• Follow the rules your parents/carers have set when using the internet
• Remember – spending too much time online can effect concentration, education, sleep and health
• Keep your profiles private – Check your privacy settings and keep everything private so not strangers can see any of your personal information
Report it and block it if you find something on the internet that makes you feel uncomfortable or worried.
They also offered some helpful advice just in case the girls do fall victim to cyber bullying:

What to do

• Ignore— If you’re the victim of “minor teasing or name calling” ignore it if you can avoid it. Sometimes bullies are encouraged by seeing a reaction and the situation can become a lot worse.
• Record—Keep a record of bullying messages you receive. If you can show an adult either the messages themselves or a diary of when you received them, it may be easier to verify what went on and who the bully was.
• Reach out—Your parents, your teachers, your friends, and even police officers can help you deal with cyber bullying or discrimination. Speak to people that you trust. There is no reason to suffer alone when you are the target of bullying.
• Cut off the bully—The National Crime Prevention Council advises victims to stop all communication with the bully when possible. If it’s cyber bullying you may be able to block their phone number so you no longer receive their calls or texts. Facebook and twitter etc allow you to block other users so that they can no longer interact with you.
Report It— You can also report If you’re being bullied via a website, chances are that the bully is going against the website’s terms of use. Youtube, facebook etc have safety centres where you can report the activity and sometimes get the bully kicked off the site.

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What Not to Do
• Sink to the bully’s level. Starting your own cyberbullying campaign against the bully will get you nowhere, it will only potentially make the situation worse
• Forward bullying content or messages. If someone sends you a bullying message, forwarding it to a friend only expands the problem. You never know how far an email chain can go.
• Believe the bully. Don’t let bullies destroy your self-esteem. No one deserves to be harassed. Bullies are cowards and their actions are often more about their own problems than they are about you. When bullying gets you down, talk about it with someone you trust who can build you back up.

Since the boys’ visit we have had an internet safety week in school when all the girls reflected on questions related to cyberbullying. In the upper school, pupils heard about the tragic story of Felix Alexander and the heart breaking open letter his mother wrote to the press. We all agreed that we should commit to BE KIND online and that if we are feeling bullied or lonely, it is so important to talk to someone about our feelings.
This is what Sophie wrote to Felix’s mum:

Dear Mrs Alexander

I am really sorry for your loss. I will try to be the better person and be kind to my friend and not hurt their feelings I will support my friends in every way even if they are going through hard time. If they are being bullied and together we can tell someone or ChildLine. I will do everything to stop them killing them self. I will never post any unkind messages to anyone.  If we all remember to be kind there will be no more cyberbullying ever. It is very important to talk to someone if you are worried or getting bullied and remember there is always someone you can talk to.

From Sophie

 
Meanwhile, if you want to hear Boycode for yourself of follow their progress you can find them on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Art and Design & Technology Exhibition

 Art, Curriculum, parental involvement, Whole School  Comments Off on Art and Design & Technology Exhibition
Oct 112016
 

artex5

artex1 artex3 On a chilly Saturday morning we made the final preparations for the exhibition and opened the art and D&T rooms up to many visitors coming to see what the pupils had designed, made and created over the last year. Some of the highlights this year were the Year 7 Muppet drawings with oil pastels, the superb GCSE Photography and Art & Design work, the inspirational sketchbooks, a selection of Year 9 stools and some fantastic ‘Art around the World’ pieces from the block group.

 

When we stop and look, we are amazed at the range of materials the students use and the quality of final pieces they come up with. We are incredibly proud of the ideas and determination to create to the best of their ability.

We love it when the younger pupils ask when they can make something that they have seen, it is a wonderful way of inspiring them.

Well done to all Alfriston Artists.
Mrs R Chapman and Mrs S Jamieson

artex2artex6

Oct 032016
 

Your daughter has brought home a leaflet about the Love in a Box campaign.  If you haven’t seen it you can see the leaflet here.  Schools, churches, other organisations and individuals collect and pack items into shoeboxes for the Mustard Seed Relief Mission to send to under privileged children throughout Eastern Europe. They have sent on average 40,000 boxes each year and each one is individually received by a child.

This campaign is endorsed by our Student Council and we really urge you to take part.  You can create your own gift box or you can donate something for a class shoebox.  Your daughter will tell you what age group her pastoral group has decided to support.  You can see some ideas for what to send in as your contribution in the list below:

Boys 3 ‐ 5 years old. Toy cars / Ball / Jigsaw / Picture Book / Soft Sweets / Crayons / Pencils / Soft Toy / Soap / Flannel / Toothbrush / Toothpaste / Hairbrush / Comb/ HAT / GLOVES.

Girls 3 ‐ 5 years old. Toy dolly / everything else as above.

Girls 6 ‐ 11 years old. Toy Dolly / Skipping Rope / Jewellery / Ball / Playing Cards / Sweets / Book / Felt Tip Pens / Pencils / Paper / Soft Toy / Flannel / Toothbrush / Toothpaste / Soap / HAT / SCARF / GLOVES.

Boys 6 ‐ 11 years old. Toy car / Yoyo / Everything else as above.

Boys 12 ‐ 15 years old. Marbles / Travel games / Juggling Balls / Baseball Cap / Playing Cards / Geometry Set / Note Book / Pens / Pencils / Soft Toy / Sweets / Soap / Flannel/ /Toothpaste / toothbrush / GLOVES / SCARVES.

Girls 12 ‐ 15 years old Hair accessories / Jewellery / Mew make up / Perfume Stick / Talc / Deodorant / Dolly / Skipping Rope / Everything else as above.

 

If you haven’t got time to go shopping then you could simply send a donation towards the postage as each gift box costs £3.00 to send on its journey.

If you make up your own shoebox there are a few points to note:

  • Please wrap the box base and lid separately as they will need to be checked en route
  • Hats, gloves and scarves are the only items of clothing allowed
  • Please attach the sticker part of the leaflet to the box
  • If you can, please enclose a minimum £3 donation
  • Place an elastic band around the box to hold the lid on
  • Christmas cards and messages are encouraged but do NOT include private addresses
  • Completed boxes must be returned to school by 4th November ready for collection by Mustard Seed Missions