May 032017
 
item 1 a

How to bid: In order to place a bid you must contact Rachel Hutchinson via postal or email bid. Details can be found below on the bidding slip. There are two separate items for auction.
Item 1 details: Signed England Cricket Shirt from the England v Sri Lanka Test Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.

item 1 a item 1 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2 details: Signed England Cricket Bat from the England v Pakistan Royal London ODI Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.item 2 aitem 2 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both items have been acquired and kindly donated by Waitrose for the South Bucks School Sport Partnership. The money raised will go directly into the partnership and will be used to buy new equipment, the cost of venue hire for events and certificates and medals for competitions.

Payment: After the closing date the highest bidder for each auction will be contacted and asked to make payment to the Alfriston School bank account via BACS, cash or cheque within one week. Once payment is received the item can be collected or hand delivered if within 25 miles of Alfriston School or alternatively via signed for parcel at Royal Mail.
Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2017 12pm midday

Contact Rachel for further details:rachel@alfristonschool.com

Mar 272017
 
waaw17

This week is World Autism Awareness Week.  Here at Alfriston we started early and, on the occasion of the Singing Showcase we had a stall to display information about Autism when parents visited.  We also had a donations bucket on the stall and raised £116.55 for the cause.  Thank you.

This week, teachers at Alfriston will be asked to take part in a quiz about autism and pupils will be able to find out more about the condition by chatting with pupils who have been identified on the spectrum.  There will also be a chance to view excerpts from the feature film about Temple Grandin.

In the meantime, read on for some information about Autism from the National Autistic Society.

 

How does autism affect children, adults and their families?

The term ‘autism’ is used here to describe all diagnostic profiles, including Asperger syndrome and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA).

  1. Without understanding, autistic people and families are at risk of being isolated and developing mental health problems.
  2. Autism is much more common than many people think. There are around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the UK – that’s more than 1 in 1001. If you include their families, autism is a part of daily life for 2.8 million people.
  3. Autism doesn’t just affect children. Autistic children grow up to be autistic adults.
  4. Autism is a hidden disability – you can’t always tell if someone is autistic.
  5. While autism is incurable, the right support at the right time can make an enormous difference to people’s lives.
  6. 34% of children on the autism spectrum say that the worst thing about being at school is being picked on2.
  7. 63% of children on the autism spectrum are not in the kind of school their parents believe would best support them3.
  8. 17% of autistic children have been suspended from school; 48% of these had been suspended three or more times; 4% had been expelled from one or more schools4.
  9. Seventy per cent of autistic adults say that they are not getting the help they need from social services. Seventy per cent of autistic adults also told us that with more support they would feel less isolated5.
  10. At least one in three autistic adults are experiencing severe mental health difficulties due to a lack of support6.
  11. Only 16% of autistic adults in the UK are in full-time paid employment, and only 32% are in some kind of paid work7.
  12. Only 10% of autistic adults receive employment support but 53% say they want it8.

 

References

1 The NHS Information Centre, Community and Mental Health Team, Brugha, T. et al (2012). Estimating the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions in adults: extending the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Leeds: NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

2 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p7

3  Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p18

4 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p8

5 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

6 Rosenblatt, M (2008). I Exist: the message from adults with autism in England. London: The National Autistic Society, p3

7 The National Autistic Society (2016). The autism employment gap: Too Much Information in the workplace. p5

8 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

 

Myths and facts about autism

Although over 700,000 people in the UK are autistic (more than 1 in 100 people), false and often negative perceptions about the condition are commonplace.

 

This lack of understanding can make it difficult for people on the autism spectrum to have their condition recognised and to access the support they need. Misconceptions can lead to some autistic people feeling isolated and alone. In extreme cases, it can also lead to abuse and bullying.

 

  • Autism affects more than 1 in 100 people – Over 700,000 people in UK are autistic, which means that 2.8m people have a relative on the autism spectrum.
  • People tend to ‘grow out’ of autism in adulthood – myth. It’s a lifelong condition – autistic children become autistic adults.
  • Autism affects both boys and girls – fact. There is a popular misconception that autism is simply a male condition. This is false.
  • Some autistic people don’t speak – fact. Some autistic people are non-verbal and communicate through other means. However, autism is a spectrum condition, so everyone’s autism is different.
  • Autism is a mental health problem – myth. Autism is a developmental disability. It’s a difference in how your brain works. Autistic people can have good mental health, or experience mental health problems, just like anyone else.
  • All autistic people are geniuses – myth. Just under half of all people diagnosed with autism also have a learning disability. Others have an IQ in the average to above average range. ‘Savant’ abilities like extraordinary memory are rare.
  • Everyone is a bit autistic – myth. While everyone might recognise some autistic traits or behaviours in people they know, to be diagnosed with autism, a person must consistently display behaviours across all the different areas of the condition. Just having a fondness for routines, a good memory or being shy doesn’t make a person ‘a bit autistic’.

 

 

Meltdown

Many autistic people experience meltdowns. The public often find it hard to tell autism meltdowns and temper tantrums apart, but they are different things. You can help by understanding autism, the person and what to do if you see someone having a meltdown.

A meltdown is ‘an intense response to overwhelming situations’. It happens when someone becomes completely overwhelmed by their current situation and temporarily loses behavioural control. This loss of control can be expressed verbally (eg shouting, screaming, crying), physically (eg kicking, lashing out, biting) or in both ways.

What to do

If someone is having a meltdown, or not responding to you, don’t judge them. It can make a world of

difference to someone on the autism spectrum and their carers.

  • Give them some time − it can take a while to recover from an information or sensory overload.
  • Calmly ask them (or their parent or friend) if they’re OK, but bear in mind they’ll need more time to respond than you might expect.
  • Make space − try to create a quiet, safe space as best you can. Ask people to move along and not

to stare, turn off loud music and turn down bright lights – whatever you can think of to reduce the

information overload, try it.

 

Watch

My Autism and Me

Be Safe When you Trick or Treat!  

 Extra Curricular, Whole School, Student Council, Community Links  Comments Off on Be Safe When you Trick or Treat!  
Oct 182016
 
halloween

 

Hallowe’en is fast approaching and you’re probably thinking about going out trick or treating.  BUT before you do, think about keeping yourself and others safe.  Read through these guidelines and organise a safe outing

 

  1. Consider only approaching neighbours you know

This will keep you safer and make the experience more sociable

 

  1. Only head to houses that are decorated

People who decorate their houses are more likely to be interested and to have planned some treats.

 

  1. Be respectful of people and property

Not everybody celebrates Hallowe’en and not everybody will open the door or give you a treat.  That’s their choice and you must respect it. Do not cause any damage to their property and be respectful to them.

 

  1. Be wary of time

Don’t go knocking too late – even people who were feeling generous early in the evening may not be so keen in the late evening.

 

  1. Be grateful

Just as some households might have hoards of sweets ready for trick or treaters, others might be less prepared. If they go raiding through their cupboard to find something, and you’re not impressed by what they find, take it and be grateful anyway.

 

  1. Remember manners

Trick or treat aren’t the only words you know!  Make sure you remember to say please and thank you.  People value politeness.

 

  1. Take an adult with you or nearby

Hallowe’en falls after the clocks go back which means it will get dark very early.  Don’t put yourself at risk; invite an adult to supervise your outing.

 

Have fun trick or treating this year!

From Hope

On behalf of Student Council

Oct 032016
 
lovein box2

Your daughter has brought home a leaflet about the Love in a Box campaign.  If you haven’t seen it you can see the leaflet here.  Schools, churches, other organisations and individuals collect and pack items into shoeboxes for the Mustard Seed Relief Mission to send to under privileged children throughout Eastern Europe. They have sent on average 40,000 boxes each year and each one is individually received by a child.

This campaign is endorsed by our Student Council and we really urge you to take part.  You can create your own gift box or you can donate something for a class shoebox.  Your daughter will tell you what age group her pastoral group has decided to support.  You can see some ideas for what to send in as your contribution in the list below:

Boys 3 ‐ 5 years old. Toy cars / Ball / Jigsaw / Picture Book / Soft Sweets / Crayons / Pencils / Soft Toy / Soap / Flannel / Toothbrush / Toothpaste / Hairbrush / Comb/ HAT / GLOVES.

Girls 3 ‐ 5 years old. Toy dolly / everything else as above.

Girls 6 ‐ 11 years old. Toy Dolly / Skipping Rope / Jewellery / Ball / Playing Cards / Sweets / Book / Felt Tip Pens / Pencils / Paper / Soft Toy / Flannel / Toothbrush / Toothpaste / Soap / HAT / SCARF / GLOVES.

Boys 6 ‐ 11 years old. Toy car / Yoyo / Everything else as above.

Boys 12 ‐ 15 years old. Marbles / Travel games / Juggling Balls / Baseball Cap / Playing Cards / Geometry Set / Note Book / Pens / Pencils / Soft Toy / Sweets / Soap / Flannel/ /Toothpaste / toothbrush / GLOVES / SCARVES.

Girls 12 ‐ 15 years old Hair accessories / Jewellery / Mew make up / Perfume Stick / Talc / Deodorant / Dolly / Skipping Rope / Everything else as above.

 

If you haven’t got time to go shopping then you could simply send a donation towards the postage as each gift box costs £3.00 to send on its journey.

If you make up your own shoebox there are a few points to note:

  • Please wrap the box base and lid separately as they will need to be checked en route
  • Hats, gloves and scarves are the only items of clothing allowed
  • Please attach the sticker part of the leaflet to the box
  • If you can, please enclose a minimum £3 donation
  • Place an elastic band around the box to hold the lid on
  • Christmas cards and messages are encouraged but do NOT include private addresses
  • Completed boxes must be returned to school by 4th November ready for collection by Mustard Seed Missions

The Big Bang @ Bucks

 Extra Curricular, Community Links, Science  Comments Off on The Big Bang @ Bucks
Jun 272016
 
science icon

Y 10 pupils had a very busy day at The Big Bang @ Bucks on Monday.  The day featured many workshops and activities for visiting primary school pupils all presented by many different organisations. One such organisation was five of our very own year 10 pupils from Alfriston: Courtney, Charlotte, Nadia, Ayesha and Hope.

They worked brilliantly in leading 180 primary school pupils through activities to excite their interest in physics. The Alfriston pupils guided the primary school pupils through fun experiences involving electromagnetism. For some the highlight was ‘thinking putty’ although the Gauss gun (led by Courtney) was also very popular. image1

Why don’t you see what you can find out about ‘thinking putty’ on the internet?

 

May 262016
 
mountain icon

I’m sure you’ve all been waiting anxiously for an update on our expedition earlier this half term.  With that in mind, I thought I’d answer two of the most frequent questions I have been asked.

How did you get on?

I would call our expedition a huge success.  We arrived at Ben Nevis to excellent condition, bar the snow that was covering most of the mountain.  It was a bit of a push, but all of us got up the mountain, which is a huge accomplishment.  One of us even had ten minutes on top by himself, making him the tallest person in the UK for a very short time.

Scafell Pike went a little less according to plan.  While a large group forged ahead, a smaller group at the back made the decision, based on the weather and safety concerns, to call it a day halfway up the mountain and return to the bottom.  So, 8 of 12 made the summit, which I would still say is an excellent achievement.

Last on our list was Snowdon.  Due to arriving later than planned in Wales, we packed our head torches and started our climb almost as soon as we arrived.  Although we made great time up the mountain, it was not to be.  Poor light, less visibility, and dropping temperatures forced us off the mountain.  In hindsight, this was an excellent decision and one that no one has second guessed.

So, there you have it.  Our Three Peaks Challenge that became a one and a half peaks challenge.

What next?

We started this challenge as a physical and mental challenge but it has become so much more.  It has given us an opportunity to help give back to the school library.  Our original target for fundraising was £1000.  Unbelievably, we reached that inside of 6 days.  So, we decided to be a little more ambitious and increase the target to £2500.  Incredibly we hit that target on the last day of fundraising.

We are now beginning the process of improving the school’s library.  A questionnaire has been sent to pastoral tutors to get ideas from the pupils and we are working to decide how best to use the funds now available to us.

To everyone who has donated, supported us, or followed our adventures on twitter, thank you.  Thank you so much for your kindness, generosity, and dedication to making Alfriston School a place where our students have to opportunity to learn and to grow.  Again, thank you.

Mr VanDenBossche

Three Peaks Team

Year 9 visit Shakespeare’s Birth Place

 Extra Curricular, Community Links, English, Curriculum  Comments Off on Year 9 visit Shakespeare’s Birth Place
May 172016
 
William Shakespeare (8)

On Tuesday the 10th May year 9 went to visit Shakespeare’s Birthplace in Stratford upon Avon. We drove there in two mini buses. It took us about an hour and a half to get there.

We   went in to a room where we looked at a puppet of Shakespeare. We also looked at the hats that they would have worn and their bowls and spoons which were made out of metal.

We went inside Shakespeare’s home. We learnt that the best bedroom was down stairs and the second best bedroom was upstairs. We also learned that they did not have toilets so they had buckets beside their bed!

When we finished Shakespeare’s home we went into the gift shop and bought some things about Shakespeare. The budget of money we had to bring was £5.00.

Our favourite part was when we were finding interesting facts about Shakespeare and his life. Our favourite fact was that the best bedroom and the best bed was only for guests.

 

Ionie and Hannah

Do you know which members of staff are taking part in the Three Peaks Challenge?

 Uncategorized, Extra Curricular, Community Links, parental involvement  Comments Off on Do you know which members of staff are taking part in the Three Peaks Challenge?
Apr 182016
 
mountain icon

I want to donate

 

…And the staff who are participating are:

  1. Mrs Younge

Mrs Younge is Head of English at Alfriston.  She joined the school this academic year and she likes afternoon tea but not the washing up!

She signed up for the Three Peaks Challenge  because she thinks it will be great to have a new and wider range of books in school for students to learn a love of reading!  She has been preparing for the challenge with lots of walks, jogs and cycle rides.  She is really hoping to complete all 3 mountains but she is worried about losing her footing and slipping over!

Please encourage her.  Perhaps you could offer her a cup of tea if she doesn’t slip over.

2. Mrs Jones

Mrs Jones, teaches Home Economics, Art, PHSE and D of E at Alfriston and is pastoral tutor to 9J. She has always been quite outdoorsy and enjoys camping and walking; her passion for mountains came about after she completed World Challenge to Guyana with students from her previous school.  She says she is not the fittest of people but will always try things outside her comfort zone.   She has previously climbed Mount Kenya, Mount Meru, Mount Kinabula and Kilimanjaro.  She so enjoys the peace and tranquillity of the scenery and open space and she would really like to complete her mountain leaders training.

Ask her what’s so great about mountains because she’ll be able to tell you!

3. Mrs Knibbs
Mrs Knibbs has just taken retirement, having taught PE at Alfriston School for many years!!!! She will be continuing to work with the South Bucks Special Schools Partnership and do some Supply teaching for Alfriston, when needed. She obviously loves all sports and she likes to take on new challenges, so the Three Peaks Challenge is definitely for her.

However, she fears that she may have to ‘pull out’ at the last minute as she is nursing a skiing injury but she hopes to be able to reach the top of at least one of the Peaks and to have fun with the team.

Please tell her “She can do it” as we don’t want all her training to be in vain!!

4. Mrs Smith (Science)

Mrs Smith is an SSA supporting largely in science and home economics.  As she is a mini bus driver, she also gets to go out on trips and visits which she loves!

She enjoys walking, particularly in the mountains, running and swimming.  Since climbing Snowdon a few years ago, she has been itching to climb Ben Nevis, so being offered the chance to climb three peaks in one go was an opportunity not to be missed! Although she has trained hard, she is still nervous about the enormity of what the team are taking on, but hopes that, with a positive frame of mind and a good team spirit, everyone will rise to the challenge.

Help her to be convinced that she can climb all three mountains, no sweat!

5. Mrs Brown

Mrs Brown has worked at Alfriston for nearly 12 years. She worked for 7 of those in the classroom as a support assistant and now she is up in boarding as part of the residential team. She has worked with children most of her life as well as having 5 of her own. She enjoys most sports and goes to the gym regularly, mostly doing group activities/classes. She also walks her 10 month old German Shepherd/Border Collie pup and that takes up a lot of her time.

She is really looking forward to the 3 peaks as she’s never done anything like it before and she hopes that she will enjoy being part of a successful team!

Go Mrs Brown and the whole team.

6. Miss Leahy

Miss Leahy teaches PE and DofE at Alfriston, as well as visiting our partnership primary schools from the South Bucks School Sports Partnership to assist with the delivery of PE across all ages.  She loves all sports and adventurous activities, especially those that involve water and incorporate a social element.  As she spent much of last year on a physio’s couch, the challenge of the 3 peaks and the chance to train with a specific focus, provided the motivation to get her out and about and fit once more!

However she’s much more accustomed to a relaxed ride up a mountain via a chairlift before descending down at leisure either on a bike or a pair of skis.

Let’s hope she won’t need those skis on any of the 3 peaks.

7. Mrs Shorrocks

Mrs Shorrocks is Head of IT at Alfriston.  She has been at the school for many years and enjoys reading, photography and spending time with her grandchildren.

She is not much of a sportswoman but does try to stay fit by walking and running and she has joined the Challenge because she wants to see the view from the top of Ben Nevis.  She is hopeful that the weather will be kind and that she will get a good photo from the summit but she is worried that her knees may give out before she is safely down from Snowdon.

Give her some tips for staying awake and NO rain-dancing!

 

8. Mrs Stevens

Mrs Stevens has been working at Alfriston for almost three years. She works mainly in the PE department but also in Boarding and coordinating the Duke of Edinburgh Award. Before working at Alfriston she was an Outdoor Instructor so she loves being outdoors and challenging herself. She has walked a lot in the past but this is a new challenge and she is looking forward to tackling it with the team!!

Good luck Mrs Stevens and the team!

9. Mr Waterman

Mr Waterman is the science teacher at Alfriston and he’s worked here for ages!  He enjoys running, going to the gym and hill-walking when he gets the chance.  He hopes that the weather will give clear views but is happy to be going when there is snow.

Thanks for organising the whole thing Mr Waterman and let’s hope your GPS keeps working!

10. Mr Van Den Bossche

11. Mrs Male

 

 

 

…and who else????

Apr 142016
 
mountain icon

On the weekend covering 28th-30th of April, a team of 11 staff members will be travelling to Scotland, Northern England, and Wales in an attempt to complete the National Three Peaks Challenge.

The National Challenge involves climbing Ben Nevis (the tallest peak in Scotland), Scafell Pike (the tallest peak in England), and Snowdon (the tallest peak in Wales) within a specified time period. Our team will be attempting to complete the challenge, ie climbing all 3 peaks, in just 24 hours.

The team has completed 2 training walks in the local area, as well as a recent walk in the Brecon Beacons National Park. They are feeling confident and are looking forward to the challenges ahead.

The team will be raising money as a part of the expedition to support refurbishments of the library at Alfriston School. This space is in need of an update in books, storage, and furniture. All monies raised through this effort will be used to fund the improvement of the library, which will have a huge impact on Literacy at Alfriston, as well as providing the pupils with a more enjoyable reading environment. The team is hoping to raise £1000 for this cause.

Below is the Just Giving link set up for this challenge, which will enable you to make any donations you wish to make online. Additionally, the link provides further information on what we hope to use the money for:

https://crowdfunding.justgiving.com/alfriston-schoolcombe hill

You will be asked to make an account, but that simply includes your email (so a donation receipt can be emailed to you) and a password for accessibility. We ask please that all voluntary donations be made through the Just Giving site in an effort to keep all donated funds in one place.

We very much hope you will be able to support us and we look forward to keeping you up to date with all the news form this expedition.

Alfriston Pupils try Radio Controlled Racing Cars

 Uncategorized, Extra Curricular, Community Links, Competition, computing  Comments Off on Alfriston Pupils try Radio Controlled Racing Cars
Jan 202016
 
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The best RC racers from across the globe were there over the weekend  to decide the Reedy International Race of Champions 2016.  This event is  the biggest 1/12 event of the 2016 calendar with 94 entrants from over a dozen countries.  Support races were provided by the Porsche Carrera Cup, for 911 bodied GT12’s and F1’s, so there was plenty of varied action for all the RC racing community.

We were more interested in the ‘Have a Go’ track though and were delighted to have the chance to build and race our very own cars.

When we arrived we were presented with a bag of car parts, a few tools and a set of instructions.  It took a while to get our heads round it but eventually we had built 3 cars.  We had to take our cars to the scrutineer to be tested before we got the go-ahead to race them.  Soon we were all lined up on the track and the designated driver for each team took the controller and waited for the lights to change ( just like in the F1 Grand Prix!).  The Spanners were easily the winners leaving the Smarties miles behind and the Blue Flash team retired at the side of the track!

In the re-run, a handicap was imposed which saw the driver being blindfolded and guided by a team mate.  It made no difference and the Spanners won again.

We really enjoyed our racing and would like to thank everybody who made it possible, especially the team from Active Learning Support who assisted us throughout.CYxBKoqWkAAaiOl CYxGLKRWsAArHEJ CYyC0FXWMAEcLRF CYyDiRBW8AQbZE0

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