Nov 142018
 

Did you know that democracy was a Greek word made up of “Dem” meaning people and “Crat” meaning ruler? Have you realised that General Elections are held on Thursdays? At least they have been ever since 1931. Do you know the difference between Parliament and Government?

Women first got the right to vote in 1918 after some unrest by politically active women. In the early 20th century women didn’t have the same rights as men – they couldn’t vote in elections and the majority could only get jobs as house servants. The suffragettes were a movement that campaigned for equal opportunities for women. As part of their protests the campaigners let off bombs, smashed shop windows and set fire to buildings – which meant they weren’t popular with everyone. You may have heard of people like Emmeline Pankhurst or Emily Davison.

 

 

 

 

 

The school council has put up a display board in the reception area at school and launched a colouring competition for pupils. In addition, they are holding a secret ballot about an initiative called Thirsty Thursdays. We will tell you more about this if the idea gets passed in the ballot.

Be Safe this Hallow e’en

 Community Links, Extra Curricular, Student Council, Whole School  Comments Off on Be Safe this Hallow e’en
Oct 282018
 

Take a look at this advice from Rosie and Chloe…

 

  • ‘trick or treating’ is more fun and safer if you go in a small group with friends and family and a responsible adult to supervise.
  • stay on the doorstep or driveway where the responsible adult can see you.
  • if you play pranks that damage property this could result in arrest and a criminal record
  • throwing eggs or flour could get you into trouble so best not to do it
  • Hallowe’en can be a night that some residents dread, so remember to be respectful and polite
  • it is possible to print out posters to show whether you want to participate in “Trick or Treating” or not so check if people are displaying such a poster before you knock on the door

You could visit these websites for more advice, posters to print and fun ideas:

Thames Valley Police

safe4autumn.com

BBC

And now the clocks have changed make sure you are safe on the roads by dressing to be seen – wear light, reflective clothes or carry a lamp or torch so that drivers and your responsible adult can see you.

You can buy reflective badges and clips from the kiosk at school (prices start at 60p)

Challenging Negative Body Image

 Extra Curricular, Participation, Student Council  Comments Off on Challenging Negative Body Image
Apr 192018
 

On the 18th April  Chloe joined young people from across the UK to attend the FIXERS day conference exploring how to support young people around body image.  The day included workshops to do with body image at school, in the health service and in the media and concluded in a panel lead by Positive Body Image Ambassador and Coronation Street Actress Melissa Johns.

Fixers is an initiative-led Public Services Broadcasting Trust that inspires young people to make a change and raise awareness of issues that are important to them. ‘Young people using their past to fix the future.’ The content certainly gave everyone a lot to talk about and food for thought on how we could challenge negative body image stereotypes in our lives and maybe some ideas about our own Fixers campaign in Bucks.

Check out the website here

Nov 202017
 

All vehicles are heavy and hard and can hit and hurt people. At higher speeds they cause more damage. At higher speeds, a driver has less time to react if a child steps out in front of them. They are more likely to hit that child and will hit them harder. Fast traffic is dangerous, frightening, noisy and polluting. It makes roads unwelcome and puts people off walking and cycling.

You can read all the facts about road speed in this handy fact sheet or watch this video to gain a better understanding of why speed matters.

Meanwhile don’t forget the importance of being bright and being seen in these long dark nights of winter. We are selling reflective items in the kiosk.

Star Clips £1.40
Zip clips 60p
Smile Badges £1.00
Reflective Laces £1.00
Reflective stickers 15p

May 032017
 

How to bid: In order to place a bid you must contact Rachel Hutchinson via postal or email bid. Details can be found below on the bidding slip. There are two separate items for auction.
Item 1 details: Signed England Cricket Shirt from the England v Sri Lanka Test Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.

item 1 a item 1 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 2 details: Signed England Cricket Bat from the England v Pakistan Royal London ODI Series 2016 including certification of authenticity from the ECB.item 2 aitem 2 b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both items have been acquired and kindly donated by Waitrose for the South Bucks School Sport Partnership. The money raised will go directly into the partnership and will be used to buy new equipment, the cost of venue hire for events and certificates and medals for competitions.

Payment: After the closing date the highest bidder for each auction will be contacted and asked to make payment to the Alfriston School bank account via BACS, cash or cheque within one week. Once payment is received the item can be collected or hand delivered if within 25 miles of Alfriston School or alternatively via signed for parcel at Royal Mail.
Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2017 12pm midday

Contact Rachel for further details:rachel@alfristonschool.com

Mar 272017
 

This week is World Autism Awareness Week.  Here at Alfriston we started early and, on the occasion of the Singing Showcase we had a stall to display information about Autism when parents visited.  We also had a donations bucket on the stall and raised £116.55 for the cause.  Thank you.

This week, teachers at Alfriston will be asked to take part in a quiz about autism and pupils will be able to find out more about the condition by chatting with pupils who have been identified on the spectrum.  There will also be a chance to view excerpts from the feature film about Temple Grandin.

In the meantime, read on for some information about Autism from the National Autistic Society.

 

How does autism affect children, adults and their families?

The term ‘autism’ is used here to describe all diagnostic profiles, including Asperger syndrome and Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA).

  1. Without understanding, autistic people and families are at risk of being isolated and developing mental health problems.
  2. Autism is much more common than many people think. There are around 700,000 people on the autism spectrum in the UK – that’s more than 1 in 1001. If you include their families, autism is a part of daily life for 2.8 million people.
  3. Autism doesn’t just affect children. Autistic children grow up to be autistic adults.
  4. Autism is a hidden disability – you can’t always tell if someone is autistic.
  5. While autism is incurable, the right support at the right time can make an enormous difference to people’s lives.
  6. 34% of children on the autism spectrum say that the worst thing about being at school is being picked on2.
  7. 63% of children on the autism spectrum are not in the kind of school their parents believe would best support them3.
  8. 17% of autistic children have been suspended from school; 48% of these had been suspended three or more times; 4% had been expelled from one or more schools4.
  9. Seventy per cent of autistic adults say that they are not getting the help they need from social services. Seventy per cent of autistic adults also told us that with more support they would feel less isolated5.
  10. At least one in three autistic adults are experiencing severe mental health difficulties due to a lack of support6.
  11. Only 16% of autistic adults in the UK are in full-time paid employment, and only 32% are in some kind of paid work7.
  12. Only 10% of autistic adults receive employment support but 53% say they want it8.

 

References

1 The NHS Information Centre, Community and Mental Health Team, Brugha, T. et al (2012). Estimating the prevalence of autism spectrum conditions in adults: extending the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. Leeds: NHS Information Centre for Health and Social Care

2 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p7

3  Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p18

4 Reid, B. (2011). Great Expectations. London: The National Autistic Society, p8

5 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

6 Rosenblatt, M (2008). I Exist: the message from adults with autism in England. London: The National Autistic Society, p3

7 The National Autistic Society (2016). The autism employment gap: Too Much Information in the workplace. p5

8 Bancroft et al (2012). The Way We Are: Autism in 2012. London: The National Autistic Society

 

Myths and facts about autism

Although over 700,000 people in the UK are autistic (more than 1 in 100 people), false and often negative perceptions about the condition are commonplace.

 

This lack of understanding can make it difficult for people on the autism spectrum to have their condition recognised and to access the support they need. Misconceptions can lead to some autistic people feeling isolated and alone. In extreme cases, it can also lead to abuse and bullying.

 

  • Autism affects more than 1 in 100 people – Over 700,000 people in UK are autistic, which means that 2.8m people have a relative on the autism spectrum.
  • People tend to ‘grow out’ of autism in adulthood – myth. It’s a lifelong condition – autistic children become autistic adults.
  • Autism affects both boys and girls – fact. There is a popular misconception that autism is simply a male condition. This is false.
  • Some autistic people don’t speak – fact. Some autistic people are non-verbal and communicate through other means. However, autism is a spectrum condition, so everyone’s autism is different.
  • Autism is a mental health problem – myth. Autism is a developmental disability. It’s a difference in how your brain works. Autistic people can have good mental health, or experience mental health problems, just like anyone else.
  • All autistic people are geniuses – myth. Just under half of all people diagnosed with autism also have a learning disability. Others have an IQ in the average to above average range. ‘Savant’ abilities like extraordinary memory are rare.
  • Everyone is a bit autistic – myth. While everyone might recognise some autistic traits or behaviours in people they know, to be diagnosed with autism, a person must consistently display behaviours across all the different areas of the condition. Just having a fondness for routines, a good memory or being shy doesn’t make a person ‘a bit autistic’.

 

 

Meltdown

Many autistic people experience meltdowns. The public often find it hard to tell autism meltdowns and temper tantrums apart, but they are different things. You can help by understanding autism, the person and what to do if you see someone having a meltdown.

A meltdown is ‘an intense response to overwhelming situations’. It happens when someone becomes completely overwhelmed by their current situation and temporarily loses behavioural control. This loss of control can be expressed verbally (eg shouting, screaming, crying), physically (eg kicking, lashing out, biting) or in both ways.

What to do

If someone is having a meltdown, or not responding to you, don’t judge them. It can make a world of

difference to someone on the autism spectrum and their carers.

  • Give them some time − it can take a while to recover from an information or sensory overload.
  • Calmly ask them (or their parent or friend) if they’re OK, but bear in mind they’ll need more time to respond than you might expect.
  • Make space − try to create a quiet, safe space as best you can. Ask people to move along and not

to stare, turn off loud music and turn down bright lights – whatever you can think of to reduce the

information overload, try it.

 

Watch

My Autism and Me

Be Safe When you Trick or Treat!  

 Community Links, Extra Curricular, Student Council, Whole School  Comments Off on Be Safe When you Trick or Treat!  
Oct 182016
 

 

Hallowe’en is fast approaching and you’re probably thinking about going out trick or treating.  BUT before you do, think about keeping yourself and others safe.  Read through these guidelines and organise a safe outing

 

  1. Consider only approaching neighbours you know

This will keep you safer and make the experience more sociable

 

  1. Only head to houses that are decorated

People who decorate their houses are more likely to be interested and to have planned some treats.

 

  1. Be respectful of people and property

Not everybody celebrates Hallowe’en and not everybody will open the door or give you a treat.  That’s their choice and you must respect it. Do not cause any damage to their property and be respectful to them.

 

  1. Be wary of time

Don’t go knocking too late – even people who were feeling generous early in the evening may not be so keen in the late evening.

 

  1. Be grateful

Just as some households might have hoards of sweets ready for trick or treaters, others might be less prepared. If they go raiding through their cupboard to find something, and you’re not impressed by what they find, take it and be grateful anyway.

 

  1. Remember manners

Trick or treat aren’t the only words you know!  Make sure you remember to say please and thank you.  People value politeness.

 

  1. Take an adult with you or nearby

Hallowe’en falls after the clocks go back which means it will get dark very early.  Don’t put yourself at risk; invite an adult to supervise your outing.

 

Have fun trick or treating this year!

From Hope

On behalf of Student Council

Oct 032016
 

Your daughter has brought home a leaflet about the Love in a Box campaign.  If you haven’t seen it you can see the leaflet here.  Schools, churches, other organisations and individuals collect and pack items into shoeboxes for the Mustard Seed Relief Mission to send to under privileged children throughout Eastern Europe. They have sent on average 40,000 boxes each year and each one is individually received by a child.

This campaign is endorsed by our Student Council and we really urge you to take part.  You can create your own gift box or you can donate something for a class shoebox.  Your daughter will tell you what age group her pastoral group has decided to support.  You can see some ideas for what to send in as your contribution in the list below:

Boys 3 ‐ 5 years old. Toy cars / Ball / Jigsaw / Picture Book / Soft Sweets / Crayons / Pencils / Soft Toy / Soap / Flannel / Toothbrush / Toothpaste / Hairbrush / Comb/ HAT / GLOVES.

Girls 3 ‐ 5 years old. Toy dolly / everything else as above.

Girls 6 ‐ 11 years old. Toy Dolly / Skipping Rope / Jewellery / Ball / Playing Cards / Sweets / Book / Felt Tip Pens / Pencils / Paper / Soft Toy / Flannel / Toothbrush / Toothpaste / Soap / HAT / SCARF / GLOVES.

Boys 6 ‐ 11 years old. Toy car / Yoyo / Everything else as above.

Boys 12 ‐ 15 years old. Marbles / Travel games / Juggling Balls / Baseball Cap / Playing Cards / Geometry Set / Note Book / Pens / Pencils / Soft Toy / Sweets / Soap / Flannel/ /Toothpaste / toothbrush / GLOVES / SCARVES.

Girls 12 ‐ 15 years old Hair accessories / Jewellery / Mew make up / Perfume Stick / Talc / Deodorant / Dolly / Skipping Rope / Everything else as above.

 

If you haven’t got time to go shopping then you could simply send a donation towards the postage as each gift box costs £3.00 to send on its journey.

If you make up your own shoebox there are a few points to note:

  • Please wrap the box base and lid separately as they will need to be checked en route
  • Hats, gloves and scarves are the only items of clothing allowed
  • Please attach the sticker part of the leaflet to the box
  • If you can, please enclose a minimum £3 donation
  • Place an elastic band around the box to hold the lid on
  • Christmas cards and messages are encouraged but do NOT include private addresses
  • Completed boxes must be returned to school by 4th November ready for collection by Mustard Seed Missions

The Big Bang @ Bucks

 Community Links, Extra Curricular, Science  Comments Off on The Big Bang @ Bucks
Jun 272016
 

Y 10 pupils had a very busy day at The Big Bang @ Bucks on Monday.  The day featured many workshops and activities for visiting primary school pupils all presented by many different organisations. One such organisation was five of our very own year 10 pupils from Alfriston: Courtney, Charlotte, Nadia, Ayesha and Hope.

They worked brilliantly in leading 180 primary school pupils through activities to excite their interest in physics. The Alfriston pupils guided the primary school pupils through fun experiences involving electromagnetism. For some the highlight was ‘thinking putty’ although the Gauss gun (led by Courtney) was also very popular. image1

Why don’t you see what you can find out about ‘thinking putty’ on the internet?

 

May 262016
 

I’m sure you’ve all been waiting anxiously for an update on our expedition earlier this half term.  With that in mind, I thought I’d answer two of the most frequent questions I have been asked.

How did you get on?

I would call our expedition a huge success.  We arrived at Ben Nevis to excellent condition, bar the snow that was covering most of the mountain.  It was a bit of a push, but all of us got up the mountain, which is a huge accomplishment.  One of us even had ten minutes on top by himself, making him the tallest person in the UK for a very short time.

Scafell Pike went a little less according to plan.  While a large group forged ahead, a smaller group at the back made the decision, based on the weather and safety concerns, to call it a day halfway up the mountain and return to the bottom.  So, 8 of 12 made the summit, which I would still say is an excellent achievement.

Last on our list was Snowdon.  Due to arriving later than planned in Wales, we packed our head torches and started our climb almost as soon as we arrived.  Although we made great time up the mountain, it was not to be.  Poor light, less visibility, and dropping temperatures forced us off the mountain.  In hindsight, this was an excellent decision and one that no one has second guessed.

So, there you have it.  Our Three Peaks Challenge that became a one and a half peaks challenge.

What next?

We started this challenge as a physical and mental challenge but it has become so much more.  It has given us an opportunity to help give back to the school library.  Our original target for fundraising was £1000.  Unbelievably, we reached that inside of 6 days.  So, we decided to be a little more ambitious and increase the target to £2500.  Incredibly we hit that target on the last day of fundraising.

We are now beginning the process of improving the school’s library.  A questionnaire has been sent to pastoral tutors to get ideas from the pupils and we are working to decide how best to use the funds now available to us.

To everyone who has donated, supported us, or followed our adventures on twitter, thank you.  Thank you so much for your kindness, generosity, and dedication to making Alfriston School a place where our students have to opportunity to learn and to grow.  Again, thank you.

Mr VanDenBossche

Three Peaks Team